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When conservative treatment in trachea laserations?

Published on: 21st July, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8639105303

Introduction: The tracheobronchial injuries are usually fatal and some of the lucky people can reach emergency services without dying in the place of trauma. They can cause severe symptoms which can be lifetreathing. This type of injuries must been taken carefully and need to decide fast what treatment you going to give. Case report: We present a 53 years old patient who has been stabbed during a fight and got his trachea ruptured. His complaints shortness of breath and neck swelling. He can be treated conservatively with bronchoscopic and clinical evaluation. Discussion: Tracheobronchial injuries are life-threatening and the airway must be secured first. They can be treated conservatively in some cases. CT can be useful but fiberoptic bronchoscopy is the key in diagnosis. Conclusion: Although early treatment of tracheal lacerations is urgent surgery, it is reported that these injuries can be treated with conservative methods under appropriate conditions.
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Video-assisted thoracic surgery in advanced non-small cell lung cancer treatment

Published on: 14th August, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8653118841

Non-small cell lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Despite recent advances in adjuvant treatments, surgical resection is basis of treatment. With the development of minimally invasive surgery in thoracic surgery, surgeons work on minimally invasive surgery for advanced stages of lung cancer, previously considered non-operable at all or previously considered non-operable with minimally invasive surgery approach. Minimally invasive surgical techniques which are routinely used in the surgical treatment of early-stage lung cancer have started to be treated in more complicated and advanced stages of lung cancer. Bilateral anatomic resections, operations after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bronchial sleeve lobectomies, double sleeve lobectomies, complementary pneumonectomies, and carinal sleeve resections can be performed by minimally invasive methods. The option of video-assisted surgery should be considered with oncological principles at foreground if patients have acceptable lung and cardiac performance conditions with minimal comorbidities. This study reviews VATS experience in patients with advanced-stage lung cancer worldwide and discusses potential benefits and limitations of using VATS technology to perform thoracic surgery procedures.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat